fingerstyle

The History of Fingerstyle Guitar

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Because notes are struck by individual digits rather than the hand working as a single unit, fingerstyle playing allows the guitarist to perform several musical elements simultaneously. One definition of the technique has been put forward by the Toronto (Canada) Fingerstyle Guitar Association:

Physically, Fingerstyle refers to using each of the right hand fingers independently in order to play the multiple parts of a musical arrangement that would normally be played by several band members. Bass, harmonic accompaniment, melody, and percussion can all be played simultaneously when playing Fingerstyle.

This article provides and interesting read on the history of fingerstyle guitar. Read More »The History of Fingerstyle Guitar

Fingerstyle

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Fingerstyle Guitar

Fingerstyle guitar is the technique of playing the guitar by plucking the strings directly with the fingertips, finger-nails, or picks attached to fingers, as opposed to flatpicking (picking individual notes with a single plectrum called a flatpick) or strumming all the strings of the instrument in chords.

The term is often used synonymously with fingerpicking. Music arranged for fingerstyle playing can include chords, arpeggios and other elements such as artificial harmonics, hammering on and pulling off with the fretting hand, using the body of the guitar percussively, and many other techniques.

Physically, “Fingerstyle” refers to using each of the right (or left) hand fingers independently in order to play the multiple parts of a musical arrangement that would normally be played by several band members. Bass, harmonic accompaniment, melody, and percussion can all be played simultaneously when playing Fingerstyle.Read More »Fingerstyle

Dust In The Wind by Kansas

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Difficulty: Intermediate

In this classic riff, you will be playing fingerstyle chords while allowing the notes to ring throughout the measures. The progression is based around standard chords that place emphasis on the root notes, set at 94 bpm (beats per minute). The progression that will be played here is C, Amadd9, Amsus4, Am, and then back to Amadd9. Below are some of the standard chords that you will be playing as well as a picture of what the chord should look like, Notice that for the Amadd9, all you are doing is removing the 1st fret note on the “B” string to play this chord. For the Amsus4 chord, all you are doing is reversing a standard Am chord by using your 4th finger to play the third fret on the “B” string instead of your 1st finger playing the first fret on the “B” string.Read More »Dust In The Wind by Kansas