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CAGED Closed Scale Patterns

The 5 Basic Patterns

The most commonly used scales by guitarists are called pentatonic
scales
. The word pentatonic gets it’s name from the Greek word “penta”
which means 5 and tonic which stands for tone. That’s what pentatonic
scales are: 5 tone scales. The reason they are so commonly used is because
their patterns are extremely well suited to the guitar’s fretboard and
allow a lot of musical freedom when you are playing them.

There are only 5 basic pentatonic patterns. They are the C, A, G, E,
and D. They are similar to the 5 basic chord patterns, because they can
be closely associated with their chord counterparts. These patterns interlock
with each other, meaning each pattern has notes that overlap with patterns
adjacent to it.

These are the fundamental building blocks of your soloing and
you will use the for many years to come. These patterns are the same thing
as the pentatonic major.

Memorize each pattern. You should
be able to identify them by name and you should know exactly which note
is their root note (marked by an “R” in the pictures on the
right).

Remember that these are patterns. To play in different key signatures
we move the patterns around.

The pictures on the left are the patterns with their suggested fingerings.
The pictures on the right are the patterns with their CAGED chord counterpart
they are associated with highlighted.

C Scale Pattern

Here is the scale pattern played in the key of C#/Db, because the root
note appears on the 4th fret of the A string.

As with all patterns it can be transposed to any key. The pattern remains
the same. Here is the same pattern in the key of F, because the root
note
appears on the 8th fret of the A string which is an F note.

Notice that it looks the same when played. The only difference is that
the pattern is being played higher up on the fretboard:

A Scale Pattern

Below is the A scale pattern in the key of C#/Db, because the root note
appears on the 4th fret of the A string.

G Scale Pattern

Below is the G scale pattern in the key of C#/Db, because the root note
appears on the 9th fret of the low E string.

E Scale Pattern

Below is the E scale pattern in the key of D, because the root note appears
on the 10th fret of the low E string.

D Scale Pattern

Below is the D scale pattern in the key of B, because the root note appears
on the 9th fret of the D string which is a B note.